What is a 10-point buck?

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If you are like most people, you have probably heard the term “ten-point buck” but may not know exactly what it refers to.

In this post, we’ll explore the origins and definition of the term “ten-point buck.” We’ll also provide some tips on how to identify one if you happen to come across one while hunting. Stay tuned!

b2 What is a 10-point buck?

WHAT DO POINTS ON A BUCK MEAN IN HUNTING?

When discussing “points” in hunting, they are referring to the tips of each piece that is over an inch long.

You may hear everything from spikes (one point), two points, or six-point – ten points being even bigger than those smaller ones! But what does it all mean? It means using the points as a benchmark to describe the quality of the deer.

The anatomy of a Whitetail’s antlers is made up of the following:

  • Burr or pedicle
  • Brow tine
  • Main beam
  • Non-typicals

The classification and scoring of a Whitetail’s antlers are done by using the more common Boone and Crockett method. This method uses a combination of letters and numbers, more specifically the letters “H” and “G” and numbers 1 to 8.

Gs – These are used to name the normal antler points on a buck. G1 refers to the brow tine on a Whitetail as that is the first point, then G2 for the next point, and so on. It is important to note that the point on the main beam of a buck is not assigned the letter G although it is considered a point.

Hs – The H is used to measure the circumference of the antlers on a Whitetail. There are only four H measuring areas on a Whitetail’s antlers and regardless of the number of points it has, there will only be four Hs.

WHAT IS A 10-POINT BUCK?

As we stated above, in the Boone and Crockett method of scoring, a 10-point buck is simply a deer with 5 points on each side of its rack. These points can be any size, as long as they are over an inch long.

HOW OLD IS A 10-POINT BUCK?

The age of a 10-point buck can vary. If the deer is a yearling, it will likely have 8 or 9 points. A 2.5-year-old deer will typically have 10 points, and a 3.5-year-old deer will have 11 or 12 points. bucks typically reach their full antler potential at 4.5 years old, at which point they will have the potential to grow up to 15 points.

b2 What is a 10-point buck?

IS A 10-POINT DEER GOOD?

The answer to this question is subjective. Some hunters prefer to hunt bucks with large antlers, while others are more interested in the meat. Ultimately, it’s up to the individual hunter to decide what they consider to be a “good” deer.

How Big Is a 10-Point Buck?

The size of a 10-point buck can vary depending on the age and health of the deer. A yearling buck is typically around 3 feet tall at the shoulder, while an adult buck can be up to 4.5 feet tall. An adult buck will also weigh more than a yearling, with males averaging between 150 and 250 pounds.

HOW TO SEE A TEN-POINT BUCK?

Although ten-point bucks can be found in many parts of the United States, they are most commonly seen in the Midwest and southeastern states. If you’re hoping to catch a glimpse of one of these deer, your best bet is to head to a state like Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Ohio, or Pennsylvania during the fall hunting season.

(How Long Do Squirrels Live? See this post for more)

TIPS FOR IDENTIFYING A 10-POINT BUCK

Now that you know what a 10-point buck is, you’re probably wondering how you can identify one if you come across one while hunting. Here are a few tips:

Look for a deer with ten points on its antlers. This is the most obvious way to identify a ten-point buck.

Measure the length of the deer’s antlers. If the antlers are at least ten inches long, you may be looking at a ten-point buck.

Check the size of the points. If the points are large and evenly spaced, you may be looking at a ten-point buck.

Look for other signs of a ten-point buck. These include large body sizes, thick necks, and heavy antlers.

Conclusion

To sum up, if you do come across a 10-point buck, be sure to take the time to identify it properly before taking a shot. Happy hunting!

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Sean Campbell’s love for hunting and outdoor life is credited to his dad who constantly thrilled him with exciting cowboy stories. His current chief commitment involves guiding aspiring gun handlers on firearm safety and shooting tactics at the NRA education and training department. When not with students, expect to find him either at his gunsmithing workshop, in the woods hunting, on the lake fishing, on nature photoshoots, or with his wife and kid in Maverick, Texas.

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