How to View Trail Camera Photos on iPad

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Video how to view trail camera photos on ipad

Thanks to technological advancements, there are multiple ways of how to view trail camera photos on iPad. You don’t have to uninstall your camera from the trail to check the photos it has captured.

Viewing pictures taken directly on your iPad provides you with instant feedback of activity happening in the area. This will help you make an informed decision that will drastically improve your chances of making your hunting successful.

You can view every detail that the trail camera has captured from your iPad, and even store them if the iPad has enough storage space.

Tips for How to View Trail Camera Photos on iPad

Use a Lightning to USB Cable

One of the best ways to check trail camera photos on your iPad is by using a lightning to USB cable. If you don’t have one, you can buy it online or from your nearest electronic shop.

However, you can only use this cable if your trail camera has a USB port. So, check before you purchase this cable. If your trail camera has a USB cable, then you are good to go. All you need to do is plug the cable into the trail camera, then link the other end to your iPad. Your trail camera will link instantly with your iPad, meaning you can start viewing or downloading photos from the trail camera directly to your iPad.

Connect lightning to SD card reader

Another way of viewing your trail camera photos on your iPad is by connecting the lightning cable directly to the SD card reader. This method is recommended, especially if your trail camera does not have a USB port. Most SD card readers have a USB port that allows you to connect with your iPad direct to view and even download photos and videos.

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The good thing about connecting to the SD card reader is that it is portable. You also don’t have to worry about compatibility issues.

USB-C Cable

Most modern iPads use USB type C cable because it is faster and more efficient. If that is the case with your iPad, you can easily view your iPad’s trail camera photos.

Connect the USB type C cable to the trail camera, then connect the iPad to the cable. Once the connection is successful, you can instantly access and view all your trail camera photos from your iPad.

Step by step tips on how to import photos from your trail camera to iPad

Importing photos directly from your trail camera to your iPad is simple and straightforward. You can use multiple devices to connect your trail camera to your iPad, including using lightning to SD card camera reader, USB-C cable, and lightning to trail camera.

Below are simple step by step direction to follow to view trail cameras photos on iPad

  • Insert the lightning to USB cable to USB type C connector on the iPad. Use the USB cable that the trail camera came with to connect the camera to the camera adapter. Turn on the trail camera, then check if it is in transfer mode. Connect your iPad to your trail camera using the lightning to USB cable, then turn on the camera to complete the connection. If you are using a memory card reader adapter, insert the SD card directly in the slot.
  • Open Photos on your iPad, then tap view or import (if you want to download them on your iPad).
  • View all the photos directly on your iPad and if you want to download them, select those you want to download, then choose your import destination.
  • Once you have viewed or imported all photos or videos from your trail camera, keep or delete them on your camera if you want to create more space.
  • Once you are done, gently disconnect the card reader or adapter.
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Benefits of viewing your trail cameras on your iPad

Of course, you may be wondering what the benefits of viewing your trail camera photos on your iPad are, yet you can view them directly from your trail camera. There are many benefits of viewing your photos from your trail camera, as discussed below.

It Makes Viewing Easier

Viewing photos and videos directly from your trail camera is time-consuming and stressful. You have to uninstall the trail camera first before you access the photos, which is time-consuming.

Viewing your photos directly from your iPads makes the entire process easy. You don’t have to uninstall your trail camera before you view your photos. All you need to do is connect a simple cable to view all your photos.

Better Viewing Experience

As they say, bigger is better. iPads have bigger screen displays and better resolution. This means that viewing your photos on your iPad provides a better viewing experience. You will view the photos with more clarity. You won’t miss any important details, thanks to improved clarity.

You can also save your photos taken on your iPad and delete them from your SD to create more space. This means you don’t need to change the SD frequently.

You Can Switch Your Camera Location Easily

An iPad allows you to have quick access to your trail camera photos. This is important because it allows you to determine whether a certain trail is a dead spot and make necessary changes. For instance, you can decide to change the camera’s location.

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It Prevents You from Leaving Your Scent

Another benefit of viewing your trail camera photos on your iPad is viewing your photos without leaving your scent. Your scent can scare away wild animals, thus preventing you from getting the information you are looking for.

It also shields your camera’s location from obvious human activity.

Bottom Line

Viewing your trail camera photos on your iPad is simple and straightforward. All you need to do is link your trail camera with your iPad using lightning to USB cable or USB type C.

Once you have established a connection, you can view all your trail camera photos directly from your iPad and even import them to your iPad to create more space on your trail camera SD card.

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Ethan Smith is a seasoned marine veteran, professional blogger, witty and edgy writer, and an avid hunter. He spent a great deal of his childhood years around the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest in Arizona. Watching active hunters practise their craft initiated him into the world of hunting and rubrics of outdoor life. He also honed his writing skills by sharing his outdoor experiences with fellow schoolmates through their high school’s magazine. Further along the way, the US Marine Corps got wind of his excellent combination of skills and sought to put them into good use by employing him as a combat correspondent. He now shares his income from this prestigious job with his wife and one kid. Read more >>