Managing Recoil: 6.5 Creedmoor

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The 6.5 Creedmoor is an affordable and widely available round suitable for hunting deer-sized prey from long distances. Even though its takedown power and range are impressive, the 6.5 Creedmoor’s recoil is below that of many comparable cartridges.

If you want to know exactly how much recoil to expect when you shoot 6.5 Creedmoor ammo, you are in the right place. Besides explaining 6.5 Creedmoor recoil and how it compares to other ammunition, we will share tips for minimizing your perceived recoil.

How Much Recoil Does a 6.5 Creedmoor Have?

Compared to other long-range ammo, 6.5 Creedmoor recoil is among the most tolerable. According to The Big Game Hunting Blog, a 143-grain 6.5 Creedmoor round generates about 18.51 foot-pounds of recoil energy and a recoil velocity of 13.86 feet per second. These numbers indicate that the 6.5 Creedmoor is less painful to shoot than a .270 Winchester or .308 round.

Despite its moderate recoil, 6.5 Creedmoor rounds are accurate and retain energy well. The bullet’s energy retention enables it to travel 200 yards without a significant drop or wind drift.

However, note that the exact level of recoil you will feel when shooting 6.5 Creedmoor will depend on your firearm and load size. Larger loads typically have more felt recoil because they require more force to launch from the muzzle. The more force needed to launch a round, the more recoil you can expect.

How to Reduce 6.5 Creedmoor Recoil

Most people can handle 6.5 Creedmoor’s moderate recoil without flinching or losing aim accuracy. However, several solutions are available if you want even less recoil when shooting 6.5 Creedmoor. Use these tips to drop 6.5 Creedmoor recoil to less noticeable levels:

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Use a Suppressor

Suppressors muffle gunfire by slowing the release of expanding propellant gasses when you fire a round. Besides causing quieter shooting, suppressors reduce recoil, leading to decreased muzzle rise and better shooting accuracy. A weighty suppressor also reduces muzzle rise by adding extra weight to your barrel to stabilize your shooting.

Attach a Muzzle Brake

Another attachment that can help reduce 6.5 Creedmoor recoil is a muzzle brake. Like a suppressor, you can attach a muzzle brake to the muzzle of your firearm. Each muzzle brake has side vents that divert propellant gasses, preventing the expanding gasses from escaping the muzzle in one direction.

Without a muzzle brake, expanding propellant gasses will explode from the front of the muzzle. The concentrated explosion in one direction will jerk the gun backward, which you experience as recoil. You can reduce recoil by over 30% with the right muzzle brake. On the downside, muzzle brakes lead to louder gunfire, but you can combat the issue by pairing a muzzle brake with a suppressor.

Pick a Smaller Load Size

6.5 Creedmoor ammo is available in various load sizes. Popular load sizes include 90, 100, 120, 123, 129, 143, and 150-grain ammo. As we mentioned earlier, heavier bullets require more force to fly from a muzzle with a flat trajectory. The more force needed to launch a round, the more recoil you will experience. If you want minimal 6.5 Creedmoor recoil, only use lighter variants of the ammo.

6.5 Creedmoor Recoil Chart

Below is a chart that showcases how 6.5 Creedmoor recoil compares to other ammunition.

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Source: The Big Game Hunting Blog

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Common Recoil Comparisons

Besides your ammo, other factors like your firearm, shooting skill level, and body size will determine how much recoil you feel while shooting. A more experienced and heavier shooter using a semiautomatic rifle will likely feel less recoil than a lightweight and inexperienced shooter using a bolt-action rifle.

To give you a better idea of what to expect when you shoot 6.5 Creedmoor ammo, below are comparisons that weigh other ammunition’s recoil against 6.5 Creedmoor’s:

6.5 Creedmoor vs. .308

The 6.5 Creedmoor and .308 are both excellent rounds for self-defense and hunting. Both rounds can take down deer-sized prey at 500 yards, but the Creedmoor experiences less drop and wind drift after 300 yards.

If your priority is minimal recoil, the 6.5 Creedmoor is the clear winner with its moderate recoil. If you shoot a 6.5 Creedmoor and .308 round from the same rifle, the 6.5 Creedmoor will have a slightly higher muzzle velocity but about 30% less recoil. The 6.5 Creedmoor’s recoil is lower mostly because the .308 is a heavier bullet.

6.5 Creedmoor vs. 7mm-08

The 7mm-08 is popular for its mild recoil, but the felt recoil is about 20% lower when shooting the 6.5 Creedmoor. A 143-grain 6.5 Creedmoor round yields a recoil velocity of around 13.86 feet per second and 18.51 foot-pounds of free recoil energy. On the other hand, a 150-grain 7mm-08 round has a recoil velocity of about 15.24 feet per second and 22.38 foot-pounds of free recoil energy.

6.5 Creedmoor vs. 30-30

30-30 Winchester ammo is an excellent choice for big game hunting, including bear and elk hunting. Despite its stopping power, its recoil is comparable to the moderate recoil of the 6.5 Creedmoor ammo. While the 6.5 Creedmoor is a smaller bullet, it has a higher velocity, flatter trajectory, and longer effective range.

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6.5 Creedmoor vs. .243

.243 Winchester rounds are smaller than 6.5 Creedmoor bullets but pack an impressive punch, delivering more bullet velocity than the 6.5 Creedmoor. .243 rounds also have a flatter trajectory and less recoil than the 6.5 Creedmoor. Depending on the load size, .243 recoil can be up to 50% less than 6.5 Creedmoor ammunition.

On the other hand, 6.5 Creedmoor ammo has more kinetic energy and less wind drift than the .243 Winchester. Since the 6.5 Creedmoor retains more kinetic energy, it is the better option for long-range hunting.

Start Shooting with Less Recoil Today

6.5 Creedmoor recoil is already very tolerable, but you can further reduce the recoil to enjoy improved accuracy and a superior shooting experience. The most hassle-free and effective solution for decreasing recoil is attaching a quality suppressor to your rifle. Fortunately, you do not have to look far to find one.

At Silencer Central, we are the leading online store for tested and trusted suppressors. We have options for different budgets, calibers, and firearms. Also, every silencer you purchase from us will come with a free NFA gun trust that allows you to choose who can use your suppressor with you. Browse our state-of-the-art suppressors and order the best one for your shooting goals today.

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Ethan Smith is a seasoned marine veteran, professional blogger, witty and edgy writer, and an avid hunter. He spent a great deal of his childhood years around the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest in Arizona. Watching active hunters practise their craft initiated him into the world of hunting and rubrics of outdoor life. He also honed his writing skills by sharing his outdoor experiences with fellow schoolmates through their high school’s magazine. Further along the way, the US Marine Corps got wind of his excellent combination of skills and sought to put them into good use by employing him as a combat correspondent. He now shares his income from this prestigious job with his wife and one kid. Read more >>