How to repair holes in fishing wader neoprene stockingfeet

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Video repairing neoprene waders

If you have damage to your neoprene stockingfeet use these tips to find and repair the hole. Neoprene stockingfeet on fishing waders can get punctured by things such as stepping on sharp rocks or gravel or from using worn out boots causing puncures or abrasion. Old worn out boots will damage neoprene stockingfeet when the liner is worn down and sharp edges are exposed. This can lead to damage on the top, toe, or bottom of the stockingfoot. Repairs are fairly easy and will hold up well if done correctly.

What you’ll need:

  • A water source for testing and somewhere dry to hang the waders.
  • Regular Aquaseal (not UV) or Aquaseal NEO.
  • Masking tape or Tenacious Tape.
  • Cardstock or a business card and latex gloves.

Step by step instructions for repairing fishing wader neoprene stockingfeet

Find the hole. The first step is to look for differences in the area that seems to be letting water through. If you can see an indentation, or abrasion in the neoprene is a good indication that something is wrong in that spot. A surefire way to test the feet is to turn the waders inside out and fill the feet with water. Usually hanging the waders while doing this is the easiest way to control the flow of water when filling the inside. If there is a hole you’ll see water dripping out of it.

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Water dripping out of a puncture hole. This is the inside of the stockingfoot (waders inside out) filled with water.
damage puncture wader neoprene stockingfoot How to repair holes in fishing wader neoprene stockingfeet
The outside of the toe. The hole can be visually seen as an indentation. These are the same waders as pictured alongside with water dripping through the hole. A sharp edge inside a worn out boot punctured this hole.

Next step; Fix the hole. Once the waders are dry this can be accomplished simply by rubbing a small amount of Aquaseal or Aquaseal NEO into the hole, making sure to rub it into the hole so that it fills the inside of the hole. We recommend backing the inside with some masking tape or Gearaid Tenacious Tape, and then filling the hole from the outside. Once it’s full and Aquaseal fills the hole apply a thin layer out to about 1/4-1/2″ on all sides of the hole. We like to apply a small piece of Tenacious Tape over the Aquaseal at this point, which will be removed later, to make a clean and smooth exterior to the patch.

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materials repair How to repair holes in fishing wader neoprene stockingfeet
Materials you will need: Aquaseal or Aquaseal NEO, tape such as clear Tenacious Tape, cardstock (packaging works well) and scissors.
Aquaseal ready How to repair holes in fishing wader neoprene stockingfeet
Cut cardstock to a rounded point and apply small amount of Aquaseal.
applying aquaseal wader stockingfoot How to repair holes in fishing wader neoprene stockingfeet
Rub it in and use the point to get it inside the hole or tear.
applying aquaseal wader stockingfoot 2 How to repair holes in fishing wader neoprene stockingfeet
Cover the area to 1/4″-1/2″ on all sides of the puncture.
tape over aquaseal repair How to repair holes in fishing wader neoprene stockingfeet
We’re using clear Tenacious tape here to help the Aquaseal cure flat.
tape over aquaseal repair2 How to repair holes in fishing wader neoprene stockingfeet
Apply the tape and rub out any air bubbles to the sides. This tape will be removed once dry in 24 hours.
peeling tape 1 How to repair holes in fishing wader neoprene stockingfeet
Peeling tape 24 hours later.
finished repair 3 How to repair holes in fishing wader neoprene stockingfeet
Finished repair. The tape makes it finish flat.
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Finished repair.

Final step; Go fishing!

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Ethan Smith is a seasoned marine veteran, professional blogger, witty and edgy writer, and an avid hunter. He spent a great deal of his childhood years around the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest in Arizona. Watching active hunters practise their craft initiated him into the world of hunting and rubrics of outdoor life. He also honed his writing skills by sharing his outdoor experiences with fellow schoolmates through their high school’s magazine. Further along the way, the US Marine Corps got wind of his excellent combination of skills and sought to put them into good use by employing him as a combat correspondent. He now shares his income from this prestigious job with his wife and one kid. Read more >>