Do Deer Eat Turnips ?

0
71

“Deer’s Dietary Habits: Unveiling the Mystery Behind Turnip Consumption”

1. “Deer’s Appetite for Turnips: A Nutritious Food Source”

Turnips have become a popular and highly nutritious food source for deer in food plots. As part of the Brassica family, turnips are known for their rapid growth during the cool seasons and high yields. They are rich in available protein and highly digestible, making them an excellent choice for deer nutrition. In fact, turnips can produce up to 6-8 tons of forage per acre, providing a substantial food source for deer.

t11 Do Deer Eat Turnips ?

One of the advantages of planting purple top turnips is that they are not affected by light frosts. In fact, their palatability increases after cold weather arrives because the young leaves become sweeter as they mature with cooler temperatures. Deer will preferentially eat both the leafy green tops and the big round roots over surrounding browse. The protruding ‘Purple Tops’ of the turnip roots allow deer better access to graze on both tops and roots.

Purple Top Turnips can be grown alone or in a mixture with other species. They require minimal growing effort and are adaptable to a wide range of conditions, although they prefer fertile, loamy soils with a pH range between 6.0 to 7.5. It is important to note that they do not grow well in heavy clay soils or poorly drained locations.

To ensure successful germination, turnip seeds require minimum soil temperatures of 45 degrees Fahrenheit. Under ideal growing conditions, they can reach maturity in 50-80 days. For hunting season, it is recommended to plant them late summer in the north or early fall in the south.

When planting turnips in a mixture with other species, it is advisable to reduce the seeding rate to prevent overcrowding and stunted growth. Turnip seeds are small and can be shallowly planted or spread into an existing plot with little or no tillage. It is recommended to drag and/or cultipack the soil after broadcasting the seeds to ensure good seed-to-soil contact and germination.

Turnips are moderate to heavy feeders, so it is important to consider fertilization. Conducting a soil test prior to applying any fertilizer is recommended for best results. An all-purpose fertilizer, such as 12-12-12, can be applied at planting, but consulting with a local agricultural extension office for a soil test and specific rate recommendations is advisable.

Overall, Purple Top Turnips are an easy-to-grow and manage crop that provides a nutritious food source for deer throughout the fall hunting season and winter months. They are a great option for both beginners experimenting with food plots and those looking to enhance previously established plots. If you’re looking for a convenient plant that satisfies deer’s appetite, Purple Top Turnips are definitely worth considering.

2. “Exploring the Deer’s Love for Turnips in Food Plots”

2. "Exploring the Deer

Deer have a strong affinity for turnips in food plots due to their high palatability and nutritional value. Turnips, especially Purple Top Turnips, are highly nutritious and provide deer with a protein-rich food source. These plants can produce up to 6-8 tons of forage per acre, making them an excellent choice for attracting and sustaining deer populations.

One of the reasons why deer love turnips is because they are not affected by light frosts. In fact, turnip palatability increases after cold weather arrives, as the young leaves become sweeter with cooler temperatures. Deer will preferentially eat both the leafy green tops and the big round roots of turnips over surrounding browse. The protruding ‘Purple Tops’ of Purple Top Turnips allow deer better access to graze on both the tops and roots of the plants.

Turnips are also a preferred food source for deer late into winter when other food sources are scarce. The turnip roots provide a valuable energy source that sustains deer during harsh winter months when alternative food options are limited.

See also  Vanilla Gourmet Vanilla Beans Madagascar Madagascar Pompona Madagascar Extra Long Mexico Uganda Comoros Tahiti Costa Rica Papua Tahitian Papua Bourbon Ecuador Indonesia Sri Lanka Peru Grade B Vanilla Beans Madagascar Comoros Uganda PNG Indonesia Tahiti Ecuador Vanilla Bean Powders Madagascar Uganda Tahiti Tahitian - PNG Ecuador Vanilla Extracts & Vanilla Pastes Madagascar 2x Vanilla Extract Madagascar Pure Vanilla (3 Bean Blend) Tahiti Vanilla Extract Madagascar Sugar-Free Ugandan Vanilla Extract Vanilla Bean Paste Vanilla Bean Seeds Ecuador Tahitian Type Madagascar Vanilla Bean Sugars Madagascar Vanilla Sugar Ugandan Vanilla Sugar Tahitian Vanilla Sugar Unclassified Vanilla Beans Papua New Guinea Vanilla Bean Cuts Madagascar red vanilla beans All Vanilla Products

When establishing turnip food plots, it is important to consider the planting conditions and requirements. Turnips prefer fertile, loamy soils with a pH range between 6.0 to 7.5. They do not grow well in heavy clay soils or poorly drained locations. It is recommended to plant turnip seeds when soil temperatures reach at least 45 degrees Fahrenheit.

To ensure successful establishment of turnip food plots, proper seeding rates should be followed. The recommended broadcast seeding rate for turnips is 10 lbs/acre if planted alone, but this can be reduced to 2-5 lbs/acre when combined with other species in a mixture. Over-seeding should be avoided as it can cause stunted growth due to overcrowding.

In terms of maintenance, turnips are moderate to heavy feeders and may require fertilization depending on the condition of the soil. Conducting a soil test prior to applying any fertilizer is recommended for best results. Turnips are relatively easy to grow and manage, making them an ideal choice for both novice and experienced food plot growers.

Overall, Purple Top Turnips are a popular choice for deer food plots due to their high nutritional value, palatability, and ability to provide sustenance throughout the fall hunting season and winter months. Whether used as a starter crop or added to existing plots, turnips can attract and support deer populations effectively.

3. “Unveiling the Irresistible Attraction of Turnips to Deer”

Turnips have an irresistible attraction to deer, making them an excellent choice for food plots. The combination of their high protein content and digestibility makes turnips a highly nutritious option for deer. Additionally, turnips can produce a large amount of forage per acre, with yields ranging from 6-8 tons.

t12 Do Deer Eat Turnips ?

One reason why turnips are so attractive to deer is their palatability. While the young leaves may be somewhat bitter at first, they become sweeter as they mature in cooler temperatures. This makes turnips even more appealing to deer as the weather gets colder.

Deer not only preferentially eat the leafy green tops of turnips but also the big round roots. Some varieties of turnips produce more leaves than roots, but Purple Top Turnips are known for their roots. The protruding purple tops of these turnip roots make them easily accessible for grazing by deer.

Even in winter when other food sources are scarce, deer will continue to come back for the turnip roots. This makes Purple Top Turnips a valuable addition to food plots during hunting season and throughout the winter months.

In terms of planting and growing, Purple Top Turnips are relatively easy to manage. They can be grown alone or in a mixture with other species and adapt well to various growing conditions. However, they prefer fertile, loamy soils with a pH range between 6.0 to 7.5.

It’s important to note that turnips do not grow well in heavy clay soils or poorly drained locations, especially during establishment. To ensure successful germination, minimum soil temperatures must reach 45 degrees Fahrenheit.

When planting Purple Top Turnip seeds, it’s recommended to broadcast seed at a rate of 10 lbs/acre if planting alone or less if mixed with other species. It’s crucial not to over-seed, as this can lead to crowded plants and stunted growth.

Turnips are moderate to heavy feeders, so it’s advisable to conduct a soil test before applying any fertilizer. An all-purpose fertilizer like 12-12-12 can be applied at planting, but following the recommended rates from a soil test will yield the best results.

In conclusion, Purple Top Turnips are an excellent choice for food plots due to their high nutritional value and attractiveness to deer. They are easy to grow and manage, making them suitable for both beginners and experienced food plot enthusiasts. Adding Purple Top Turnips to your food plots will provide a valuable food source for deer during hunting season and throughout the winter months.

See also  How To Fit Snow Chains on Car Tyres - Easy Guide

4. “Why Do Deer Devour Turnips? Unraveling the Mystery”

Turnips: A Nutritious and Palatable Food Source

Deer are known to have a preference for turnips due to their high nutritional value and palatability. Turnips, especially Purple Top Turnips, are rich in protein and highly digestible, making them an excellent food source for deer. Additionally, turnips can produce a substantial amount of forage per acre, with yields reaching up to 6-8 tons. This abundance of food makes turnips an attractive option for deer, especially during the cooler periods of the year when they grow best.

The Role of Cold Weather

One interesting aspect of turnip consumption by deer is the effect of cold weather on their palatability. When young, turnip leaves can be somewhat bitter; however, as the plants mature with cooler temperatures, they become sweeter. This change in taste makes turnip greens even more appealing to deer as winter approaches. Furthermore, while other food sources may become scarce during winter, deer will continue to graze on the turnip roots, providing them with sustenance when resources are limited.

Purple Tops: A Beneficial Feature

Purple Top Turnips have a unique characteristic that makes them particularly enticing to deer. The round roots of these turnips protrude above the soil line and turn purple at the shoulders while remaining white below ground. These “Purple Tops” make it easier for deer to access both the tops and roots of the plants, increasing their overall appeal as a food source. Even late into winter when other options are scarce, deer will keep returning to feed on the nutritious turnip roots.

In summary, the combination of high nutritional value, palatability, and accessibility makes turnips an irresistible choice for deer. Whether it’s the protein-rich leaves or the sweet-tasting roots, turnips provide a reliable food source throughout the fall hunting season and winter months. Their adaptability to various growing conditions and minimal maintenance requirements make Purple Top Turnips an excellent addition to any food plot, whether it’s a standalone crop or part of a mixture.

5. “Turnips: The Ultimate Delicacy for Hungry Deer”

Paragraph 1:

Purple Top Turnips are a highly nutritious food plot species that are widely planted and loved by deer. They belong to the Brassica family, which includes crops like radish, kale, rutabaga, rapeseed, and broccoli. These plants are known for their rapid cool season growth and high yields. Turnips are cool season annuals that thrive during cooler periods of the year. They not only provide high levels of available protein but can also produce an impressive 6-8 tons of forage per acre.

Paragraph 2:

One of the remarkable characteristics of Purple Top Turnips is their resilience to light frosts. In fact, their palatability increases after cold weather arrives as the young leaves become sweeter with cooler temperatures. Deer preferentially eat both the leafy green tops and the big round roots of turnips over surrounding browse. The protruding ‘Purple Tops’ make it easier for deer to graze on both the tops and roots. Even in winter when other food sources are scarce, deer will continue to come back for the turnip roots.

List:

– Purple Top Turnips can be grown alone or in a mixture.
– They require minimal growing effort and adapt well to a wide range of conditions.
– They prefer fertile, loamy soils with a pH range between 6.0 to 7.5.
– They do not grow well in heavy clay soils, wet areas, or poorly drained locations.
– Minimum soil temperatures of 45 degrees Fahrenheit are required for turnip seeds to germinate.
– Under ideal growing conditions, turnips can reach maturity in 50-80 days.
– For hunting season, plant late summer in the north or early fall in the south.
– The recommended broadcast seeding rate is 10 lbs/acre, but this can be reduced when planting with other species.
– Turnip seed is small, so it’s important not to over-seed to avoid crowded growth.
– Turnips are moderate to heavy feeders and may benefit from soil testing and fertilization.

See also  11 Pretty & Creative Bow Holder DIY Ideas

Overall, Purple Top Turnips are an excellent choice for food plots. They are easy to grow and manage, providing a great crop for deer throughout the fall hunting season and winter months. Whether you’re a beginner or have an established plot that needs rejuvenation, Purple Top Turnips are a reliable option.

6. “Feeding Frenzy: How Turnips Satisfy a Deer’s Palate”

6. "Feeding Frenzy: How Turnips Satisfy a Deer

Increased Palatability

Turnips are a highly preferred food source for deer due to their palatability. While the young leaves of turnip plants may initially be bitter, they become sweeter as they mature with cooler temperatures. This increase in sweetness makes them more appealing to deer, who will actively seek out both the leafy green tops and the big round roots of turnips over other available browse.

Nutritional Value

Purple Top Turnips offer a high nutritional value for deer. They are rich in available protein and highly digestible, providing essential nutrients for deer during the fall hunting season and winter months when other food sources may be scarce. Additionally, turnips can produce up to 6-8 tons of forage per acre, making them a valuable food plot species for sustaining deer populations.

Growth and Adaptability

Turnips belong to the Brassica family, which is known for its rapid cool season growth and high yields. Purple Top Turnips can adapt to a wide range of growing conditions but prefer fertile, loamy soils with a pH range between 6.0 to 7.5. They do not grow well in heavy clay soils or poorly drained locations. With minimal growing effort, turnips can reach maturity in 50-80 days under ideal conditions.

Planting Recommendations

For optimal results, it is recommended to plant Purple Top Turnips late summer in the north or early fall in the south, aligning with hunting seasons. The broadcast seeding rate is typically 10 lbs/acre if planted alone or reduced to 2-5 lbs/acre when combined with other species. It is important not to over seed as overcrowding can lead to stunted growth. Turnip seeds are small and can be shallowly planted or spread into an existing plot with little or no tillage.

Fertilization and Management

Turnips are moderate to heavy feeders and may require fertilization if the food plot has not been fertilized in a while. Conducting a soil test prior to applying any fertilizer is recommended for best results. An all-purpose fertilizer, such as 12-12-12, can be applied at planting according to the soil test recommendations. Purple Top Turnips are easy to grow and manage, making them a great choice for both beginners and experienced food plot enthusiasts.

In conclusion, Purple Top Turnips are an excellent food plot species for deer due to their high nutritional value, palatability, and adaptability. They provide a valuable food source during hunting season and winter months when other forage options may be limited. Whether planted alone or in a mixture with other species, turnips can thrive under optimal growing conditions and offer a satisfying feast for deer populations.

In conclusion, deer have been observed to eat turnips, particularly during the winter months when other food sources are limited. However, their preference for turnips may vary depending on factors such as availability and competition. Overall, turnips can serve as a supplementary food source for deer, but it is important to consider the potential impact on crop yield if planting them specifically for wildlife consumption.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here