5-Foot Alligator Picks a Fight With 1 Young Bull Shark; Who Wins the Rare Fight?

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Video alligator vs bull shark

After catching photographs of a bull shark vs. an alligator, a Florida fisherman became popular on social media.

According to WPTV, David Zinn was fishing along a river in Port St. Lucie on May 28 when the gator and the shark approached him.

He recalled when Zinn and his father that they got a bite while fishing. Zinn was taken aback when he discovered he had caught a young bull shark.

Together, they dashed down to the shark’s “razor mouth” to remove the hook. That’s when fishing became risky.

“Down by the water, a five-foot (1.5 meter) gator lunged at us,” Zinn said, 9news.com.au reported.

Zinn told the channel that he assumed it was a shark since it was “putting up a good fight.” He photographed the shark and the gator since it is unusual for both species to be in the same spot, according to WPTV.

“That’s pretty phenomenal because they usually don’t occur in the same places. But in this case, they did right up in the river there,” Mark Perry, the executive director of the Florida Oceanographic Society, said in the same 9news.com.au report.

YIKES!!! A visitor to Port St Lucie got a heck of a shock when he caught a small bull shark in the St Lucie River. He got even a bigger shock when an alligator came close for some lunch. Shark swam away. As did the gator. 🐊 🦈 📸 David Zinn #OnlyInFlorida @WPTV @FOX29WFLX pic.twitter.com/jsYnvHAt4s

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Despite the uncommon nature of the meeting, Perry said it serves as a warning to be cautious and mindful that both sharks and alligators like the river habitat.

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It’s not the first time the odd couple has been sighted on the Treasure Coast. An alligator and a bull shark were seen swimming in the Indian River Lagoon in a viral video last year.

9News.com.au, citing the Florida Museum of Natural History’s International Shark Attack File, said there were 73 unprovoked shark bites on people, and 39 provoked bites last year, compared to 57 unprovoked bites in 2020.

While bull sharks are considered an “aggressive species” that can be found in both saltwater and freshwater habitats, marine biologist Chris Lowe told 9news.com.au in January that blacktip sharks are more likely to bite.

Alligators vs. Sharks: Who Usually Wins The Fight?

AtoZAnimals said alligators are semi-aquatic reptiles while sharks are cartilaginous fish. Alligators are shorter, heavier, and have a weaker bite than sharks. In addition, sharks swim quicker than alligators. On the other hand, Sharks have far more keen senses than alligators, allowing them to locate food in the water with more ease and accuracy.

Both are ambush predators. However, alligators frequently ambush from the water onto land. Sharks are only able to hunt in the water. Alligators can survive for a short period in saltwater, while sharks live in saltwater. These are the most significant distinctions between the two species.

When a shark fights an alligator, the same AtoZAnimals report said the bigger shark species typically win. Alligators are smaller, weaker, and less powerful than sharks. The combat would begin with the shark’s acute sense of smell detecting the alligator in the water. It would charge toward it, slamming its entire weight against the alligator while delivering a bone-crushing bite.

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The alligator can bite and thrash, and it might injure the shark. However, the initial bite from a shark, which is nearly certain to land, will cause so much damage to the alligator that it will be unable to fight back.

Because of its poor vision and the saltwater, the alligator won’t be able to see where the shark is biting, so the shark will just go for a key region on the alligator’s head or limbs.

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