5 Things to Do After Shooting a Deer

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Many hunters put in countless hours of preparation into shooting a deer, but what happens after you’ve successfully pulled the trigger?

It is common for hunters to put a lot of time and effort into planning, prepping, and practicing to get ready for their hunt. But when it comes to what they’ll do after they’ve actually shot a deer, most hunters are not nearly as prepared as they need to be. An important part of preparing for your hunt is to have a plan in place on what to do after you pull the trigger.

Continue reading to learn five things every hunter needs to do after they’ve shot a deer.

5 Things Every Hunter Should Do After Shooting a Deer

You’ve shot your deer! Great! Now what? Here’s what you should do right after you shoot your deer.

  1. Stop and Wait — Before climbing down from your treestand or leaving your blind, wait for a while, at least 30 minutes after shooting your deer. If your bullet didn’t cause immediate death, waiting for a half-hour can help prevent your wounded animal from being scared and further pushed into the woods. During this time, take a moment to gather your thoughts and soak in what happened. Also, use this time to pinpoint landmarks along the deer’s path so you can quickly establish the blood trail.
  2. Get Your Picture — This is an exciting moment in your life that you’ll never want to forget, so make sure to get your picture! Before you haul your deer down the mountain, take a little bit of time to capture this incredibly exciting moment. Here are some tips that will get you the perfect photo.
  3. Field Dressing — This is an essential step in the process. Field dressing needs to happen as soon as possible. Removing the deer’s internal organs allows the carcass to begin cooling, which slows bacterial growth. This step is necessary to preserve the meat and significantly affects the quality of the venison. Make sure you do not puncture any of its organs and try to minimize any fur, dirt, and any other debris from getting in the animal. The sooner this all happens, the better.
  4. Get It Down the Mountain — The best way to get your deer down the mountain would be to load it into the back of a trailer or side-by-side, but that’s not always possible, thanks to your location or the surrounding terrain. Many hunters must drop their deer out of the field or woods. Always use a tarp under the deer to avoid contact with the ground and do whatever you can to minimize the amount of debris from entering the deer.
  5. Hang Your Deer — Once you get your deer to your destination, make sure to hang it up right away. This keeps the deer off the ground and allows any remaining blood to drain out of its system. Now you can get your deer to the butcher or do the work yourself.
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Contact R & K Hunting Company

Shooting a deer is an exciting part of your hunt, but it is certainly not the end of the adventure! For more tips and tricks on what to do after you’ve shot your deer, book your hunt with the experts at R & K Hunting Company! Our professionals have decades of experience and knowledge on what to do before, during, and after you pull the trigger. Contact us to book your next hunt in the scenic Rocky Mountains of Utah and Wyoming today.

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Ethan Smith is a seasoned marine veteran, professional blogger, witty and edgy writer, and an avid hunter. He spent a great deal of his childhood years around the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest in Arizona. Watching active hunters practise their craft initiated him into the world of hunting and rubrics of outdoor life. He also honed his writing skills by sharing his outdoor experiences with fellow schoolmates through their high school’s magazine. Further along the way, the US Marine Corps got wind of his excellent combination of skills and sought to put them into good use by employing him as a combat correspondent. He now shares his income from this prestigious job with his wife and one kid. Read more >>