Deer Box Stand Plans

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This step by step diy woodworking project is about deer box stand plans. The project features instructions for building a 4×8 deer blind. This is a heavy duty construction that will stand time for many years in a row. If you want to decrease the costs or the total weight of the construction, you should place the studs 24″ on center, instead of 16″. Make sure you take a look over the rest of plans to see alternatives and more projects for your garden. Premium Plans for this project available in the Shop.

When buying the lumber, you should select the planks with great care, making sure they are straight and without any visible flaws (cracks, knots, twists, decay). Investing in cedar or other weather resistant lumber is a good idea, as it will pay off on the long run. Use a spirit level to plumb and align the components, before inserting the galvanized screws, otherwise the project won’t have a symmetrical look. If you have all the materials and tools required for the project, you could get the job done in about a day. See all my Premium Plans HERE.

Projects made from these plans

It’s that simple to build a 4×8 deer box!

Deer Box Stand Plans

Cut & Shopping Lists

  • A – 7 piece of 2×4 lumber – 45″ long, 2 pieces – 96″ long JOISTS
  • B – 1 piece of 3/4″ plywood – 48″x96″ long FLOOR
  • C – 2 pieces of 2×4 lumber – 96″ long, 4 pieces – 72″ long, 2 pieces – 89″ long, 5 pieces – 22 1/2″ long, 5 pieces – 32 1/2″ long 2xSIDE WALL
  • D – 2 pieces of 2×4 lumber – 41″ long, 3 pieces – 72″ long, 2 pieces – 14″ long BACK WALL
  • E – 2 pieces of 2×4 lumber – 41″ long, 2 pieces – 72″ long, 2 pieces – 22 1/2″ long, 2 pieces – 32 1/2″ long, 2 pieces – 38″ long FRONT WALL
  • F – 1 piece of 2×6 lumber -96″ long, 7 pieces of 2×6 lumber – 46 1/2″ long RAFTERS
  • G – 2 pieces of 3/4″ plywood – 48″x77″ long, 4 pieces – 48″x82 1/2″ long WALLS
  • H – 2 pieces of 3/4″ plywood – 34 1/2″x52 3/4″ long, 1 piece – 31 1/2″x52 3/4″ long ROOFING SHEETS
  • I – 40 sq ft of tar paper, 40 sq ft of asphalt shingles ROOFING
  • 37 pieces of 2×4 lumber – 8′
  • 5 pieces of 2×6 lumber – 8′
  • 10 piece of 3/4″ plywood – 48″x96″
  • 40 sq ft of tar paper, 40 sq ft of asphalt shingles
  • 500 pieces 2 1/2″ screws
  • 200 pieces 1 5/8″ screws
  • door latch, handle, hinges
  • brackets for stand
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Tools

Hammer, Tape measure, Framing square, Level

Miter saw, Drill machinery, Screwdriver, Sander

Safety Gloves, Safety Glasses

Time

One day

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How to build a 4×8 deer stand

The first step of the project is to build the frame of the floor. As you can easily notice in the diagram, we recommend you to cut the components at the right dimensions. Drill pilot holes through the rim joists and insert 2 1/2″ screws into the joists. Make sure the corners are square and insert screws to lock everything together tightly.

If you want to protect the joists from moisture you can fit a couple of 4×4 skids under the frame.

Attach the 4×8 plywood sheet to the joists and align the edges as shown in the diagram. Drill pilot holes and insert 1 1/4″ screws to lock the plywood sheet to the joists tightly.

Continue the project by assembling the side walls. Cut the components from 2×4 lumber using the information from the diagram. Drill pilot holes through the plates and insert 2 1/2″ screws into the studs, as shown in the diagram. Remember that you can modify the size of the window opening to suit your needs.

Fit the side walls to the floor of the deer box and align the edges. Use a spirit level to make sure the walls are plumb and lock them temporarily into place using 2×4 braces. Drill pilot holes through the bottom plates and insert 2 1/2″ screws into the floor joists.

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Next, you need to build the back wall for the 4×8 deer blind. Cut the components at the right dimensions. Drill pilot holes through the bottom and top plates and insert 2 1/2″ screws into the studs. Make sure the corners are square and align everything with attention.

Build the front wall in the same manner described above.

Fit the front and the back walls to the floor of the deer blind. Align the edges with attention, making sure the corners are right-angled. Drill pilot holes and insert 2 1/2″ screws to lock the adjacent walls together tightly. Drill pilot holes through the bottom plates and insert 2 1/2″ screws into the floor joists.

Build the rafters from 2×6 lumber. Mark the cut lines on the beams and get the job done with a circular saw. Smooth the edges with sandpaper for a professional result.

Next, attach the rafters to a 2×6 beam, as shown in the plans. Drill pilot holes through the beam and insert 2 1/2″ screws into the rafters, making sure you place them equally-spaced.

Fit the rafters to the top of the deer box and align everything with attention. Drill pilot holes through the rafters and insert 2 1/2″ screws into the plates.

Next, attach the 3/4″ plywood panels to the back of the deer box. Make the cuts to the panel as shown in the diagram. Drill a starting holes and make the openings with a jigsaw. Attach the panels to the walls and secure them into place with 1 1/4″ screws.

Build the back panel and secure it to the studs with 1 1/4″ screws. Make sure you leave no gaps between the studs and the panels.

Next, you need to attach the panels to the sides of the deer blind. Start with the short side. Make the cuts to the plywood sheets and secure them to the wall frames using 1 1/4″ screws or nails. Leave no gaps between the components for a professional result.

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Build the panels for the taller side and lock them into place with 1 1/4″ screws or nails.

Use the panel that you have cut out from the back wall and transform it into a door. Secure the door to the wall with several hinges. In addition, install a latch to lock the door into place tightly.

One of the last steps of the project is to attach the roofing sheets to the rafters. Cut the sheets from 3/4″ plywood and center them to the rafters, as shown in the diagram. Drill pilot holes and insert 1 1/4″ screws into the rafters, every 8″. Leave no gaps between the sheets and the rafters.

Cover the roof with the tar paper and then install asphalt shingles. Alternatively, you can seal the roof by installing corrugated metal sheets.

Fill the holes and dents with wood putty and let it dry out for several hours. Use 120-200 grit sandpaper to smooth the surface. Remember that you can adjust the design and size of the deer blind to suit your needs. Check out the 6×6 deer blind plans we also have on our site.

Top Tip: If you want to enhance the look of the project and to protect the components from decay, we recommend you to apply paint or stain.

Take a look over the rest of the related projects for more outdoor inspiration. Premium Plans for this project available in the Shop.

If you want to get PREMIUM PLANS for this project (different design with re-engineered structure), in a PDF format, please press GET PDF PLANS button bellow. Thank you for the support.

This woodworking project was about deer box stand plans. If you want to see more outdoor plans, we recommend you to check out the rest of our step by step projects. LIKE us on Facebook and Google + to be the first that gets out latest projects and to hep us keep adding free woodworking plans for you.

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Ethan Smith is a seasoned marine veteran, professional blogger, witty and edgy writer, and an avid hunter. He spent a great deal of his childhood years around the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest in Arizona. Watching active hunters practise their craft initiated him into the world of hunting and rubrics of outdoor life. He also honed his writing skills by sharing his outdoor experiences with fellow schoolmates through their high school’s magazine. Further along the way, the US Marine Corps got wind of his excellent combination of skills and sought to put them into good use by employing him as a combat correspondent. He now shares his income from this prestigious job with his wife and one kid. Read more >>