Sitka Black-tailed Deer (Odocoileus hemionus sitkensis) Printer Friendly

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General Description

The Sitka black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus sitkensis) is smaller, stockier, and has a shorter face than other members of the black-tailed group. Sitka black-tailed deer are closely related to the larger Columbia black-tailed deer of the Pacific Northwest, and both are considered subspecies of the (even larger) mule deer of the American West. Fawns are born in early June and weigh 6-8 pounds at birth. The average October weight of adults is about 80 pounds for females (does) and 120 pounds for males (bucks), although bucks of over 200 pounds have been reported. The summer coat of reddish-brown is replaced by dark brownish gray in winter. A Sitka black-tail buck’s antlers are dark brown with typical black-tailed branching. Normal adult antler development is three points on each side. Antlers are relatively small, with very few scoring more than 110 points by the Boone and Crockett system. The average life-span of a Sitka black-tail is about 10 years, but some live as long as 15 years.

Life History

Growth and Reproduction

Sitka black-tail fawns are born in late spring, following the breeding season in late November. Breeding bucks spend little time foraging and by late November have used up much of their fat reserve, while does generally enter December in prime condition. Does breed during their second year of life and continue producing fawns annually until they reach 10 or 12 years of age. Prime-age does (5-10 years) typically produce two fawns annually.

As the winter snowpack recedes, deer disperse and begin to move about; migratory deer move to high elevation alpine/subalpine habitats while resident deer remain throughout the forest at lower elevations. Summer and early fall are periods of active foraging as deer accumulate fat reserves to help get them through the winter and early spring. With the first signs of winter, usually the first heavy frost, deer in higher alpine and subalpine areas descend to upper elevations of the rain forest.

Deer populations in Alaska are dynamic and fluctuate considerably with the severity of winters. Mild winters generally allow for an increase in the population, but a particularly harsh winter typically spells decline for the population. The deer’s high reproductive potential helps depressed populations to recover rapidly.

Feeding Ecology

During summer, deer generally feed on herbaceous vegetation and the green leaves of shrubs. In winter they are restricted to evergreen forbs and woody browse. When snow is not a problem, deer prefer evergreen forbs such as bunchberry and trailing bramble. During periods of deep snow, deer eat woody browse such as blueberry, yellow cedar and hemlock, and arboreal lichens. This browse alone, however, is not an adequate diet and deer rapidly deplete their energy reserves when restricted to such a limited diet.

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Deer thrive on a mixed diet. These browsers eat the leaves and stems of woody plants and shrubs, as well as forbs – perennial and annual green forest plants. Unlike grazers such as cattle, sheep and bison, they very rarely eat grass. They do graze on emerging sedges on beaches during a short window in the spring.

Range and Habitat

The Sitka black-tailed deer is native to the wet coastal rain forests of Southeast Alaska and north-coastal British Columbia. Its range has expanded as a result of transplants, and established populations now exist near Yakutat, in Prince William Sound, and on Kodiak and Afognak Islands.

While virtually all of Southeast Alaska was covered in ice 18,000 years ago during the last glacial maximum, refugia did exist on Prince of Wales, Dall Island and areas to the west that are now submerged. Many animals persisted, including bears, marmots and even caribou, but no evidence has been found that deer were present in these refugia. The oldest deer bone in Southeast Alaska was found in Nautilus Cave on the west side of Heceta Island, dating at 8,180 years old. Deer likely moved north up the coast as the glaciers receded.

Deer swim well and are found on all Southeast Islands except remote Forrester Island.

Summer and winter home range areas vary from 30-1,200 acres and, for radio-collared deer on Admiralty Island, they average about 200 acres. Migratory deer have larger annual home ranges than resident deer. The average distance between summer and winter home ranges is five miles for migratory deer and half a mile for resident deer. Movement of deer between watersheds appears to be minimal during winter. During winter, the distribution of deer at various elevations is influenced by changing snow depth. During extreme snow accumulation, many deer congregate in heavily timbered stands at lower elevations and some may even move on to the beach.

Deer research on Prince of Wales Island provides a general idea of how much habitat a Sitka black-tailed deer needs, and what deer densities are in good years in good habitat. That work indicates 20 to 25 deer per square mile. That’s about one deer per 26 to 32 acres. A NFL football field is 160’ x 360’ feet or 1.3 acres. An area encompassing 20 to 25 football fields is about the area needed to support a deer, and that’s good habitat with forage for winter and summer, with a mix of canopy cover and open areas.

Status, Trends, and Threats

Deer have inhabited northern Southeast Alaska since their migration from southern refugia following the Pleistocene epoch. Deep snow keeps the number of deer on the mainland lower than that on adjacent islands. A population estimate suggests about 200,000 deer in Southeast Alaska (Merriam 1970). The Southeast Alaska region wide annual average harvest in recent decades has been about 12,300 deer.

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Deer populations tend to fluctuate seasonally, primarily in response to winter weather and wolf and bear predation. Clearcut logging has and will continue to further reduce deer carrying capacity in some areas. In some areas illegal hunting is also a factor.

To determine trends in deer populations in many parts of Alaska, biologists conduct pellet group surveys. Biologists and technicians walk a transect line about a mile long, stretching from the beach to the subalpine, looking for deer pellets or droppings in a meter-wide line. Deer defecate with great regularity, 12 times per day on average per deer. Considering that as a constant, and how long the pellets persist in environment, it’s possible to take information on number of pellet groups and relate that back to the size of the deer herd in that particular area. The same areas are surveyed, so trends can be determined. Biologists consider anecdotal evidence as well as the pellet surveys when estimating deer populations trends. Reports from hunters, harvest data, deer harvest reports (which included effort even if no deer are harvested), and general sightings along highways also contribute to the picture. In some years, aerial surveys and mortality surveys have been conducted.

Deer were introduced to the Yakutat area in 1934.

Prince William Sound and North Gulf Coast (GMU 6) The Cordova Chamber of Commerce introduced Sitka black-tailed deer to Hawkins and Hinchinbrook islands between 1916 and 1923.

Kodiak & adjacent islands (GMU 8) Deer were introduced to Kodiak Island in three transplants, totaling 25 deer, between 1924 and 1934. In 1930, two more deer were captured from Prince of Wales Island and released on Long Island. There was, however, little natural movement from Long Island to Kodiak, so in 1934, nine deer were captured in the Rocky Pass area near Petersburg and released on Kodiak.

Threats

Deer populations are prone to dramatic population swings, largely attributable to severe winter weather. The 2006-07 and 2007-08 winters had exceptional high snowfall persisting on the ground late in the spring in Southeast Alaska, and evidence indicates population declines of varying severity, depending on the area.

Of more concern, habitat capability and deer numbers are expected to decline in some areas as large tracts of previously logged areas reach the closed canopy stem exclusion stage and become extremely poor deer habitat. Population models predict declines in deer carrying capacity in the Ketchikan area of 50-60 percent by the end of the logging rotation in 2054.

Prince of Wales Island has several issues: POW likely has the highest level of illegal or unreported harvests, estimated to be equal to the reported harvest due to extensive and increasing road system, lack of law enforcement personnel and high unemployment. In addition, actual hunter kill could be 38% greater than total estimated harvests from hunter reports because of crippling loss. During the next five to 10 years large tracts of previously logged areas will reach the closed canopy stem exclusion stage; large tracts of land will be converted to extremely poor deer habitat, and consequently, habitat capability and deer numbers are expected to decline.

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[Click Here to Shop .300 Winchester Magnum Ammo]What we can do is provide a framework to understand what average conditions might look like, and whether those are reasonably viable for a shot from the average shooter to harvest a mule deer in the fewest number of shots possible, i.e., ethically. Let’s dive right in. In the question of “Is the .300 Winchester Magnum within the ideal range of suitable calibers for mule deer hunting?” our answer is: Yes, the .300 Winchester Magnum is A GOOD CHOICE for mule deer hunting, under average conditions, from a mid-range distance, with a medium grain expanding bullet, and with correct shot placement.Let’s look at those assumptions a bit closer in the following table. Assumption Value Caliber .300 Winchester Magnum Animal Species Mule Deer Muzzle Energy 3520 foot-pounds Animal Weight 225 lbs Shot Distance 150 yardsWhat is the average muzzle energy for a .300 Winchester Magnum? In this case, we have assumed the average muzzle energy for a .300 Winchester Magnum round is approximately 3520 foot-pounds. What is the average weight of an adult male mule deer? Here we have leaned conservative by taking the average weight of a male individual of the species, since females generally weigh less and require less stopping power. In this case, the average weight of an adult male mule deer is approximately 225 lbs. [Click Here to Shop .300 Winchester Magnum Ammo]What is the distance this species is typically hunted from? Distance, of course, plays an important role in the viability of a given caliber in mule deer hunting. The kinetic energy of the projectile drops dramatically the further downrange it travels primarily due to energy lost in the form of heat generated by friction against the air itself. This phenonemon is known as drag or air resistance. Thus, a caliber that is effective from 50 yards may not have enough stopping power from 200 yards. With that said, we have assumed the average hunting distance for mule deer to be approximately 150 yards. What about the other assumptions? We have three other primary assumptions being made here. First, the average bullet weight is encapsulated in the average muzzle energy for the .300 Winchester Magnum. The second important assumption is ‘slightly-suboptimal’ to ‘optimal’ shot placement. That is to say, we assume the mule deer being harvested is shot directly or nearly directly in the vitals (heart and/or lungs). The third assumption is that a projectile with appropriate terminal ballistics is being used, which for hunting usually means an expanding bullet.Various calibersA common thread you may encounter in online forums is anecdote after anecdote of large animals being brought down by small caliber bullets, or small animals surviving large caliber bullets. Of course those stories exist, and they are not disputed here. A 22LR cartridge can fell a bull elephant under the right conditions, and a newborn squirrel can survive a 50 BMG round under other specific conditions. Again, the goal of this article is simply to address the question of whether .300 Winchester Magnum is within the ideal range of suitable calibers to harvest mule deer - and to this question, the response again is yes, the .300 Winchester Magnum is A GOOD CHOICE for mule deer hunting. [Click Here to Shop .300 Winchester Magnum Ammo]This article does not serve as the final say, but simply as a starting point for beginner hunters, as well as a venue for further discussion. Please feel free to agree, disagree, and share stories from your own experience in the comments section below. Disclaimer: the information above is purely for illustrative purposes and should not be taken as permission to use a particular caliber, a statement of the legality or safety of using certain calibers, or legal advice in any way. You must read and understand your own local laws before hunting mule deer to know whether your caliber of choice is a legal option.Foundry Outdoors is your trusted home for buying archery, camping, fishing, hunting, shooting sports, and outdoor gear online.We offer cheap ammo and bulk ammo deals on the most popular ammo calibers. We have a variety of deals on Rifle Ammo, Handgun Ammo, Shotgun Ammo & Rimfire Ammo, as well as ammo for target practice, plinking, hunting, or shooting competitions. Our website lists special deals on 9mm Ammo, 10mm Ammo, 45-70 Ammo, 6.5 Creedmoor ammo, 300 Blackout Ammo, 10mm Ammo, 5.56 Ammo, Underwood Ammo, Buffalo Bore Ammo and more special deals on bulk ammo.We offer a 100% Authenticity Guarantee on all products sold on our website. Please email us if you have questions about any of our product listings. Leave a commentComments have to be approved before showing up Your Name * Your Email * Your Comment * Post Comment

As of 2012, all samples collected from Alaska deer were free of chronic wasting disease.

Fast Facts

  • Size Up to 200 pounds, but more typically 120 pounds.
  • Distribution Found in coastal rainforests of Southeast Alaska and north-coastal British Columbia. The range has been expanded to include populations near Yakutat, in Prince William Sound, and on Kodiak and Afognak Islands.
  • Diet Herbivorous; deer feed on vegetation and green leaves of shrubs, along with evergreen forbs and woody browse.
  • Predators Wolf, black and brown bears.
  • Reproduction Deer have 1-2 fawns annually, with twins being most common in does of prime breeding age.
  • Remarks Alaska deer have been noted as being subject to a number of parasites and diseases, the most significant being lungworm.

Did You Know?

  • Sitka black-tailed deer are cousins to the larger Columbia black-tailed deer of the Pacific Northwest, and both are closely related to the (even larger) mule deer of the American West.
  • The Sitka black-tailed deer is the most-pursued species of big game in Southeast Alaska. During the 20 years from 1987 to 2007, there has been an average annual harvest of 12,334 deer.

Uses

The Sitka black-tailed deer is the most-pursued species of big game in Southeast Alaska. During the 20 years from 1987 to 2007, there has been an average annual harvest of 12,334 deer.

Management

Evaluation of deer populations for management is based on a variety of indicators, including pellet-group surveys, hunter contacts, field observations, harvest questionnaires, and mortality transects.

Research

As of 2012, a research project on Sitka Black-tailed deer is underway on northeast Chichagof Island, and deer have been equipped with GPS collars.

More Resources

General Information

  • Sitka Black-tailed Deer — Wildlife Notebook Series (PDF 75 kB)
  • Alaska’s Wild Wonders – Deer (page 2) (PDF 2,729 kB)
  • Annual Cycle of a Migratory Southeast Deer
  • Deer Colonize New Areas (Alaska Wildlife News article)
  • Deer Eat Poisonous Plants (Alaska Wildlife News article)
  • Skunk Cabbage and Deer: Trail Camera Gallery Feature (Alaska Wildlife News article)
  • Keeping Chronic Wasting Disease Out of Alaska (Alaska Wildlife News article)
  • Game transplants in Alaska: Sitka black-tailed deer (PDF 5,001 kB)

Deer Hunting

  • Deer Hunting Information
  • Board of Game

Management & Research Reports

  • Sitka Black-tailed Deer — Research Reports
  • Sitka Black-tailed Deer — Management & Harvest Reports
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Ethan Smith is a seasoned marine veteran, professional blogger, witty and edgy writer, and an avid hunter. He spent a great deal of his childhood years around the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest in Arizona. Watching active hunters practise their craft initiated him into the world of hunting and rubrics of outdoor life. He also honed his writing skills by sharing his outdoor experiences with fellow schoolmates through their high school’s magazine. Further along the way, the US Marine Corps got wind of his excellent combination of skills and sought to put them into good use by employing him as a combat correspondent. He now shares his income from this prestigious job with his wife and one kid. Read more >>