Oklahoma Deer Season 2023 New Dates & Regulation

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Deer hunting in Oklahoma is available from October 1st until the middle of January, and is regulated by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation (ODWC). Different bag restrictions apply to hunting for antlerless deer in each of the state’s 10 antlerless deer zones. All you need to know about deer hunting seasons, permits, and laws in the Sooner State may be found in this page.

Oklahoma deer seasons
Oklahoma deer seasons

Oklahoma Deer Season

Hunting seasons, rules, and bag limits for deer are all established by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation (ODWC). Different bag restrictions on antlerless deer are enforced in each of the state’s 10 antlerless deer zones. Both residents and non-residents need a hunting license, with choices including yearly and five-year permits. Depending on the method of hunting (archery, muzzleloader, or firearm), hunters must get the appropriate license. Certain permits are available for young hunters.

General Deer Season

MethodOklahoma Deer Seasons Start DateOklahoma Deer Seasons End DateBag Limits (Deer Archery)1-Oct-2315-Jan-24Six: Only two may be antlered. The hunter’s overall deer archery season quota of six deer is unaffected. (Youth Deer Gun)20-Oct-2322-Oct-23Two: One may be antlered. Antlerless mule deer cannot be harvested. The hunter’s combined season limit of six deer includes all juvenile deer gun season kills, but they do not count against the regular deer gun season limit of four. (Deer Muzzleloader)28-Oct-235-Nov-23Four: one may be antlered. Antlerless mule deer cannot be harvested. Zones limit antlerless animal harvests. Zone 1—No antlerless harvesting. Deer-free zones 2-8. 3-9 antlerless zones. One zone-10 antlerless. Antlerless Deer Zones. The hunter’s six-deer muzzleloader season restriction is unaffected. (Deer Gun)18-Nov-233-Dec-23Four: one may be antlered. Antlerless mule deer cannot be harvested. Zones limit antlerless animal harvests. One zone-1 antlerless deer. Deer-free zones 2-8. 3-9 antlerless zones. One zone-10 antlerless. Antlerless Deer Zones. The hunter’s six-deer season restriction is unaffected. (Holiday Antlerless Deer Gun)18-Dec-2331-Dec-23Two: Solely antlerless. Antlerless mule deer cannot be harvested. Hunters may shoot six deer every season, except holiday antlerless deer gun season deer.

Antlerless Deer Zones

Zone-1

Antlerless Days Zone 1Season Dates Archery SeasonOct 1, 2023 – Jan 15, 2024 Youth Deer Gun SeasonOct 20 – 22, 2023 Muzzleloader SeasonNo antlerless days Deer Gun SeasonNov 18 – Dec 3, 2023 Holiday Antlerless Deer Gun SeasonClosed

Zones 2, 7 & 8 (Oklahoma Antlerless Days)

Zones 2, 7 & 8 (Oklahoma Antlerless Days)Hunting Dates Archery SeasonOct 1, 2023 – Jan 15, 2024 Youth Deer Gun SeasonOct 20 – 22, 2023 Muzzleloader SeasonOct 28 – Nov 5, 2023 Deer Gun SeasonNov 18 – Dec 3, 2023 Holiday Antlerless Deer Gun SeasonDec 18 – 31, 2023

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Zones 3, 4, 5, 6 & 9 (Antlerless Days)

Zones 3, 4, 5, 6 & 9 (Oklahoma Antlerless Days)Hunting Dates Archery SeasonOct 1, 2023 – Jan 15, 2024 Youth Deer Gun SeasonOct 20 – 22, 2023 Muzzleloader SeasonOct 28 – Nov 5, 2023 Deer Gun SeasonNov 18 – Dec 3, 2023 Holiday Antlerless Deer Gun SeasonDec 18 – 31, 2023

Zone-10 (Antlerless Days)

Zone 10 (Oklahoma Antlerless Days)Hunting Dates Archery SeasonOct 1, 2023 – Jan 15, 2024 Youth Deer Gun SeasonOct 20 – 22, 2023 Muzzleloader SeasonOct 28 – Nov 5, 2023 Deer Gun SeasonNov 18 – Dec 3, 2023 Holiday Antlerless Deer Gun SeasonDec 18 – 31, 2023

Bag Limit:

Deer hunters are only allowed to harvest a total of six deer throughout the season, with only two of those animals allowed to have antlers. The same holds true for other forms of hunting, such as young deer gun, muzzleloader, and gun seasons for deer. The last year total season restriction will be applied to any deer harvested between January 1 and January 15. Antlerless deer killed during the holiday antlerless deer gun season or during a controlled hunt do not count against the combined season quota.

Elk Hunting Seasons

Elk Consolidated Season Limit

SpeciesDateBag Limit ElkJan. 1 – Jan. 31, Two ElkArchery, youth elk gun, elk muzzleloader, elk gun, holiday antlerless elk gun seasonsTwo Controlled huntsNot Included Total Combined SeasonTwo

Open Zones Seasons

TypeHunting Dates Elk ArcheryOct 1, 2023 – Jan 15, 2024 Youth Elk GunOct 13, 2023 – Oct 15, 2023 Elk MuzzleloaderOct 28, 2023 – Nov 5, 2023 Elk GunNov 18, 2023 – Dec 3, 2023 Holiday Antlerless Elk GunDec 18, 2023 – Dec 31, 2023

Elk Open Zones Bag Limit

Zone NameBag Limit Panhandle ZoneTwo elk (1 antlerless) Special Northwest ZoneOne elk, regardless of sex Northwest ZoneOne elk, regardless of sex Northeast ZoneOne elk, regardless of sex Southeast ZoneOne elk, regardless of sex Southwest ZoneOne elk, regardless of sex

Special Southwest Zone

Elk Special Southwest Zone SeasonHunting Dates ArcheryOct 7-11, 2023 Dec 2-6, 2023 MuzzleloaderSeason closed GunOct 5-8, 2023 Dec 7-10, 2023 Youth Elk GunOct 13-15, 2023 Additional Antlerless Gun Season (antlerless only)Nov 18 – Dec 3, 2023 Jan 1-31, 2024

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Note:

  • Limit of two (2) elk per hunter per zone; one (1) must be antlerless.
  • There is no harvest quota in this zone.

Regulations

  • You must first get permission from the owner to hunt on private land.
  • It is prohibited to have a deer that was taken by another individual without the proper tags.
  • Hunting from a motorized land, air, or sea vehicle is prohibited, as is firing over a public road, highway, or railroad.
  • Prime shooting time is between half an hour before sunrise and half an hour after dark.
  • While it is prohibited to employ dogs for deer hunting, you may use a leashed dog to locate a fallen buck if you first notify a game warden.
  • It is forbidden to bury a dead animal in a water source such as a well, spring, pond, or stream, or to leave the corpse of a dead animal within a quarter mile of an occupied structure or public road.
  • Hunters must wear at least 400 square inches of hunter daylight bright orange, including a hat and clothing, to meet with requirements.
  • The total season deer bag limit is six; however, only two may be antlerless (defined as having at least 3 inches of antler protruding above the hairline).
  • Remember the following rules to prevent weapon accidents: Always assume a weapon is loaded, point the muzzle away from yourself and others, keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to fire, and be aware of what is beyond your objective.
  • Keep broadheads covered, choose your target deer, and ensure there are no other deer or people in the area.
  • Hunters should understand how to correctly climb and secure tree stands, and they should always use a full-body safety harness and a safety line to avoid accidents from falls.
  • Rather of lugging anything up the ladder, climb above it and stroll down into it. The hauling is done by hand.
  • Dogs are not permitted to be used to hunt bears, deer, elk, antelope, or turkeys.
  • The hunter has 24 hours after leaving the hunting area to report his or her capture to the Department, whether it be a deer, elk, antelope, bear, or turkey. Following the submission of a report, a body tag or online confirmation number will be supplied. This tag or confirmation number must accompany the corpse at all phases of processing and storage at a commercial facility.
  • No person shall take, attempt to take, catch, capture, kill, or attempt to kill any deer, feral animal, or other wildlife, except fish and frogs or as provided by law, by means of a vehicle-mounted spotlight or other powerful light, by what is commonly referred to as “headlighting” (or “spotlighting”), or any light enhancement device used at night (night scope).
  • Except for deer gun seasons, an owner or agricultural lessee or their authorized agent may use any legal means of take, day or night, to safeguard agricultural crops, animals, processed feed, seed, or other commodities utilized in the production of an agricultural commodity.
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Reporting & Deer Tagging

A deer harvested in Oklahoma must have a field tag attached as soon as possible. The hunter’s name, customer ID number, date of harvest, and time must all be included on the tag. Once the deer have been tagged, they may be field dressed and relocated. Within 24 hours after capturing a deer, the hunter must register the animal via the Go Outdoors Oklahoma smartphone app, the online E-check system, or an authorized department personnel. Checking the deer results in the hunter receiving a carcass tag or an online confirmation number, both of which must stay with the deer until the corpse is processed or stored.

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD)

Deer are among the animals most at risk for contracting Chronic Wasting Illness (CWD), a deadly wasting disease of the nervous system. Holes in the brains of infected deer have been discovered in many locations in the United States and Canada. However, in 2022, a case of CWD was discovered only 2.5 miles south of the Oklahoma-Texas line. The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation set up a Selective Surveillance area in the state’s southern region as a reaction. In this zone, only specific sections of killed deer and elk are permitted to leave the area, and the whole animals must be processed before leaving. Hunters are asked to volunteer their killed deer for testing, and the CDC advises against ingesting meat from animals that seem unwell or test positive for CWD. draft a few bullet points

Hours for Deer Hunting and Shooting.

An hour and a half before the scheduled dawn to an hour and a half after the scheduled dusk. Visit the website of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife here.

Define antlered deer.

Any deer, male or female, with antlers that extend at least three inches above the hairline on either side.

FAQs related to Oklahoma Deer Season

Dates & Regulations Source: Wildlife Oklahoma

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Ethan Smith is a seasoned marine veteran, professional blogger, witty and edgy writer, and an avid hunter. He spent a great deal of his childhood years around the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest in Arizona. Watching active hunters practise their craft initiated him into the world of hunting and rubrics of outdoor life. He also honed his writing skills by sharing his outdoor experiences with fellow schoolmates through their high school’s magazine. Further along the way, the US Marine Corps got wind of his excellent combination of skills and sought to put them into good use by employing him as a combat correspondent. He now shares his income from this prestigious job with his wife and one kid. Read more >>