DECEMBER FISHING

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December Fishing

Published on Bassmaster.com December 10, 2008

December is easily one of the least fished months of the year for bass fisherman. Most people have other things on their minds. There are the holidays, shopping, traveling, hunting and the end of the fall frenzy taking much of the blame. On Lake Fork, you will find more duck hunters and crappie fisherman than you will bass fishermen in December, despite the fact that Fork is one of the best trophy bass lakes in the country.

I’m guilty of getting sidetracked myself. I don’t get a lot of guide trips booked this time of the year, so I spend more days at home than I do on the water. This is the time of the year when I hit the tackle shops, work on my boat, clean my reels and do some the computer work that I’ve been putting off. But it doesn’t mean there isn’t good fishing in December.

A couple of years ago we had a warming trend on Lake Fork, and I had a day when we caught 109 bass. This was a very unusual circumstance when the water temps got back up in the 60s, but it goes to show that you can catch good numbers even in December.

If you go to the Basslog and click on the “custom search” option, you can query the database yourself and determine how you should fish. The more information you know, the more accurate your search will be. For instance, you know the month (December), so click on month and choose December. If that’s all you want to search, choose “that’s enough criteria” and click “go,” and it will search the entire database for everything recorded for December. Then, it will return 1 of 4 different queries — game plan, top locations, top lures and specific top lures.

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For this particular search, the game plan query returns the following:

Time of day Lure Structure 1st light to sunup chrome/blue 1/4-oz lipless crankbait solid color 6- to 10-ft creek channel with vegetation & trees sunup to 9:00AM blue fleck Texas rig curly tail worm 3/16-oz lead bullet weight 0 to 5-ft shallow flats with trees 9:01AM – 12:00PM black/blue Texas rig curly tail worm 1/8-oz screw in weight 0 to 5-ft shallow flats with matted vegetation 12:01PM – 3:00PM watermelon/red flake Texas rig small finesse worm 1/8-oz lead bullet weight 11- to 15-ft bridge with cement 3:01PM – 5:00PM chrome/blue 1/2-oz lipless crankbait solid color 6- to 10-ft creek channel with vegetation & trees 5:01PM to dark red lipless crankbait under 1/4-oz solid color 6- to 10-ft shallow flats with submerged vegetation midnight to 1st light white/chartreuse shallow diving crankbait small rounded bill 11- to 15-ft boat docks with no obvious cover

The other 3 queries return the following: Top Locations

Top structure & depth Top cover 1) creek channel (6 to 10 ft)

  1. vegetation & trees
  2. submerged vegetation
  3. trees
  4. no obvious cover
  5. riprap
  6. matted vegetation
  7. rock pile
  8. brushpile

2) shallow flats (0 to 5 ft)

  1. submerged vegetation
  2. vegetation & trees
  3. trees
  4. matted vegetation
  5. boulders
  6. cattails
  7. sparse vegetation
  8. no obvious cover
  9. lily pads
  10. sparse trees
  11. gravel
  12. brushpile

3) shallow flats (6 to 10 ft)

  1. vegetation & trees
  2. submerged vegetation
  3. cattails
  4. lily pads
  5. trees
  6. sparse vegetation
  7. matted vegetation

4) flats near dropoff (0 to 5 ft)

  1. submerged vegetation
  2. no obvious cover
  3. vegetation & trees
  4. boulders
  5. lay down tree
  6. matted vegetation
  7. sparse vegetation
  8. trees
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5) creek channel (0 to 5 ft)

  1. vegetation & trees
  2. trees
  3. riprap
  4. submerged vegetation

6) secondary point (6 to 10 ft)

  1. submerged vegetation
  2. no obvious cover
  3. boulders
  4. brushpile
  5. trees
  6. sparse vegetation
  7. rockpile

7) creek channel (11 to 15 ft)

  1. trees
  2. no obvious cover
  3. riprap
  4. submerged vegetation
  5. sparse vegetation
  6. brushpile

8) flats near dropoff (6 to 10 ft)

  1. submerged vegetation
  2. trees
  3. cattails
  4. rockpile
  5. no obvious cover
  6. boulders
  7. sparse vegetation

9) main lake point (0 to 5 ft)

  1. rockpile
  2. riprap
  3. vegetation & trees
  4. submerged vegetation
  5. no obvious cover
  6. lily pads
  7. matted vegetation

10) main lake point (6 to 10 ft)

  1. submerged vegetation
  2. trees
  3. brushpile

Top Lures

  1. lipless crankbait
  2. Texas rig worm
  3. crankbait
  4. C-rig worm
  5. skirted jig
  6. drop shot
  7. jig/worm
  8. soft jerkbait
  9. weightless sinking worm
  10. spinnerbait

Specific Lures

Top Lures Best Color(s) 1) 1/2-oz lipless crankbait

  1. chrome/blue
  2. white
  3. orange
  4. red
  5. pumpkinseed
  6. multi-color
  7. chrome/black
  8. red/yellow

2) rubber skirted jig

  1. black/blue
  2. green pumpkin
  3. brown
  4. multicolor
  5. camo
  6. white
  7. black/red flake

3) 1/4 oz lipless crankbait

  1. chrome/blue
  2. Tennessee shad
  3. orange
  4. multi-color
  5. bleeding bait

4) medium diving crankbait

  1. shad
  2. crawfish red
  3. multicolored
  4. citrus shad
  5. brown/orange
  6. firetiger
  7. baby bass
  8. blue/chartreuse
  9. maroon
  10. green/orange
  11. white
  12. Tennessee shad
  13. black/silver

5) unskirted jig with worm body

  1. green pumpkin
  2. green pumpkin/chartreuse
  3. watermelon

6) Texas rig curly tail worm

  1. blue fleck
  2. black/blue
  3. gold
  4. junebug
  5. tequila sunrise

7) soft jerkbait

  1. watermelon
  2. watermelon candy
  3. watermelon/red flake
  4. watermelon/chartreuse
  5. shad
  6. green/white

8) deep diving crankbait

  1. shad
  2. red
  3. brown
  4. blue/chartreuse
  5. baby bass
  6. white/chartreuse

9) Texas rig small finesse worm

  1. green pumpkin
  2. watermelon/red flake
  3. chartreuse
  4. junebug/red flake
  5. watermelon
  6. pumpkinseed

10) drop shot finesse worm

  1. watermelon/red flake
  2. watermelon
  3. bluegill
  4. multicolor
  5. black/purple
  6. black
  7. green smoke
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I encourage you to search the Insider Basslog for yourself and learn as much as you can. We especially encourage you to record every bass you catch, whether you catch it in a lake, pond, creek, river, etc. It will especially benefit you in the future if you record your fish as soon as you get home from your outing. You will be surprised just how many details we forget over time. The more fish get logged, the more accurate it will become and the more fish you will catch.

Be sure to look for my next articles as I plan to write about deep water fishing.

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Ethan Smith is a seasoned marine veteran, professional blogger, witty and edgy writer, and an avid hunter. He spent a great deal of his childhood years around the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest in Arizona. Watching active hunters practise their craft initiated him into the world of hunting and rubrics of outdoor life. He also honed his writing skills by sharing his outdoor experiences with fellow schoolmates through their high school’s magazine. Further along the way, the US Marine Corps got wind of his excellent combination of skills and sought to put them into good use by employing him as a combat correspondent. He now shares his income from this prestigious job with his wife and one kid. Read more >>